Homeopathy is time less and without limit

(NewsTarget) Homeopathy is an ancient idea, recognised by keen observers of nature. Hippocrates, the father of medicine, was born around 460 BC. He recognised that diseases come from natural sources, rather than the superstitious sources popular at the time. He became a careful observer. He recognised that each case is individual. He also recognised that when treating a hitherto unknown case, he could use similar remedies, from similar cases.

As well as recognising that a body can heal itself, he understood the importance of cleanliness, of a good diet and of exercise: ideas that took a couple of millennium to become common practice.

Paracelsus (1493 – 1541) was an alchemist and a doctor. He was outspoken against doctors doing more harm than good. He stated: “All things are poison, for there is nothing without poisonous qualities … it is only the dose which makes a thing poison.” This is close to the homeopathic principle of using minute doses of the substance, even poisons. He believed that health rested on “the inner harmony of man”, something homeopaths easily identify with.

William Cullen (1710 – 1790), a Scottish physician and lecturer on chemistry, wrote A Treatise of Materia Medica in 1789.

In 1790, Samuel Hahnemann, the founder of modern day homeopathy, translated this work into German. It was here that he discovered the idea that cinchona bark produces the very same fever in a healthy person that it so capably heals in a sick person. This was a eureka moment for Hahnemann and he experimented with this idea on himself. When he took a dose, he developed the same symptoms it was known to cure. And so, based on ancient wisdom, modern day homeopathy was born.

Samuel Hahnemann was a highly intelligent man, far ahead of his time. He was a doctor, a chemist and a linguist. (He was proficient in Latin, Greek, Italian, Hebrew, Arabic and French.) He was interested in philosophy and literature.

His change from practicing medicine to discovering homeopathy came about after he found it unacceptable to continue with the current medical practice of doing more harm than good.

He spent the rest of his life experimenting, observing, developing the complete philosophy of homeopathy and writing guide-lines for following practitioners. One of his most important instructions is:

“The highest ideal of cure is rapid, gentle and permanent restoration of health, or removal and annihilation of the disease in its whole extent, in the shortest, most reliable, and most harmless way, on easily comprehensible principles.”

He clearly understood the nature of disease, the nature of the medicines and the nature of man – the three key areas fundamental to healing.

The 100 odd medicines he developed homeopathically are still as much in use today, for exactly the same reasons, as they were 200 years ago. There may have been large changes in our environment and in our technology, but there have been no changes in who we are and how we respond to outside pressure.

Much good can be done by using some of the common remedies in home prescribing. However, this highly sophisticated medical modality works best when it is practised by a competent professional homeopath who works by understanding the mental and emotional state the person is in. This is when miracles can occur, when the incurable is cured.

Homeopathy is one of the few modalities of health which fully appreciates the mind-body connection.

Homeopathy works as well on animals as it does on people.

Based on highly ethical procedures, all homeopathic testing (called provings) are done on healthy people.

 

http://www.naturalnews.com/030889_homeopathy_health.html

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Successful Experiment Shows Homeopathic Arnica Stimulates Wound Healing Genes

Given the central role of macrophages in tissue repair and regeneration, we formulated the hypothesis that one of the cellular targets of Arnica m. an action is the macrophage and accordingly decided to evaluate this plant’s effects in vitro on the THP-1 human cell line, a widely used model for immune modulation. This cell line is widely used in laboratories for the study of macrophage biochemistry and molecular biology.

The advantage of a cell line resides essentially in the easier reproducibility of experiments in the same conditions, avoiding the variations due to individual sensitivity of different donors. Since we used very low doses of drugs—even with the highest Arnica m. 2c dilution, in the assay medium the sesquiterpene lactones are in the 10−8 Mol/L dose—we expected small effect sizes and so preferred to use a highly reproducible model. THP-1 cells resemble primary monocytes, but when treated with low doses of phorbol esters (PMA) they differentiate to cells with the morphological and functional features of tissue macrophages. On the basis of environmental cues and molecular mediators, macrophages differentiate to either a proinflammatory type (M1) or to an anti-inflammatory or pro-reparatory type (M2).

Accordingly, we used THP-1 macrophages polarized by interleukin-4 (IL-4) treatment to a phenotype that takes on characteristic properties functional to immune regulation, wound healing, and tissue remodeling. The results of this work indicate that Arnica m. acts on macrophages by modulating a number of genes and by increasing cell motility. RNA-Seq analysis allowed the identification of several genes which are particularly sensitive to ultra-low doses and high dilutions of this plant extract.

Molecular analysis of gene expression suggests that a primary action of this medicinal plant is the stimulation of tissue matrix synthesis. These findings provide new insights into wound-associated molecular events and specifically point to macrophage fibronectin production as a potential therapeutic target of Arnica m. for the treatment of wound repair.

Successful Experiment Shows Homeopathic Arnica Stimulates Wound Healing Genes

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Sprinter Usain Bolt Bounces Back from Injury With The Aid Of Homeopathy to Win Gold

At the beginning of July 2016, Usain Bolt withdrew from Olympic trials with a grade 1 tear in his hamstring. He immediately went to Germany for homeopathic medical treatment. Then he improved so quickly by getting this amazing homeopathic treatment that he completed just a month later in the Rio 2016 Olympics and won gold three times!

The Olympic sprinter and famed winner of numerous gold medals have been using homeopathy since the age of 16. He is a patient of German sports doctor Hans-Wilheim Muller-Wohlfahrt who uses homeopathy at his Munich clinic. “I’ve been coming here since I was 16,” the world record holder said at a press conference in Munich. “It’s been a long relationship. Every time I have a problem, he always gives good advice and treatments. He’s the best at what he does. We are very close,”

Bolt was born with scoliosis, a curvature of the lower spine, which makes him more susceptible to back pain and injuries.

There are thousands of trained homeopathic physicians in Germany and Dr. Müller-Wohlfahrt is a world leader in the treatment of sports injuries. “He is well-known for his holistic approach. Though conventionally trained in medicine and orthopedics, his treatment includes manual diagnostics, as well as herbal and homeopathic remedies and acupuncture. Other famous patients include Paula Radcliffe, Kelly Holmes, Tyson Gay, Ronaldo, Michael Owen, Steven Gerrard and Boris Becker. He is also the team doctor for German national football team and FC Bayern München.”

Sprinter Usain Bolt Bounces Back from Injury With The Aid Of Homeopathy to Win Gold

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homeopathy really does work

I was a dedicated scientist about to begin a PhD in neuroscience when, out of the blue, homeopathy bit me on the proverbial bottom.

Science had been my passion since I began studying biology with Mr Hopkinson at the age of 11, and by the age of 21, when I attended the dinner party that altered the course of my life, I had still barely heard of it. The idea that I would one day become a homeopath would have seemed ludicrous.

That turning point is etched in my mind. A woman I’d known my entire life told me that a homeopath had successfully treated her when many months of conventional treatment had failed. As a sceptic, I scoffed, but was nonetheless a little intrigued.

She confessed that despite thinking homeopathy was a load of rubbish, she’d finally agreed to an appointment, to stop her daughter nagging. But she was genuinely shocked to find that, after one little pill, within days she felt significantly better. A second tablet, she said, “saw it off completely”.

I admit I ruined that dinner party. I interrogated her about every detail of her diagnosis, previous treatment, time scales, the lot. I thought it through logically – she was intelligent, she wasn’t lying, she had no previous inclination towards alternative medicine, and her reluctance would have diminished any placebo effect.

Scientists are supposed to make unprejudiced observations, then draw conclusions. As I thought about this, I was left with the highly uncomfortable conclusion that homeopathy appeared to have worked. I had to find out more.

So, I started reading about homeopathy, and what I discovered shifted my world for ever. I became convinced enough to hand my coveted PhD studentship over to my best friend and sign on for a three-year, full-time homeopathy training course.

Now, as an experienced homeopath, it is “science” that is biting me on the bottom. I know homeopathy works, not only because I’ve seen it with my own eyes countless times, but because scientific research confirms it. And yet I keep reading reports in the mediasaying that homeopathy doesn’t work and that this scientific evidence doesn’t exist.

The facts, it seems, are being ignored. By the end of 2009, 142 randomised control trials (the gold standard in medical research) comparing homeopathy with placebo or conventional treatment had been published in peer-reviewed journals – 74 were able to draw firm conclusions: 63 were positive for homeopathy and 11 were negative. Five major systematic reviews have also been carried out to analyse the balance of evidence from RCTs of homeopathy – four were positive (Kleijnen, J, et alLinde, K, et alLinde, K, et alCucherat, M, et al) and one was negative (Shang, A et al). It’s usual to get mixed results when you look at a wide range of research results on one subject, and if these results were from trials measuring the efficacy of “normal” conventional drugs, ratios of 63:11 and 4:1 in favour of a treatment working would be considered pretty persuasive.

Of course, the question of how homeopathy works is another matter. And that is where homeopathy courts controversy. It is indeed puzzling that ultra-high dilutions of substances, with few or no measurable molecules of the original substance left in them, should exert biological effects, but exert biological effects they do.

There are experiments showing that homeopathic thyroxine can alter the rate of metamorphosis of tadpoles into frogs, that homeopathic histamine can alter the activity of white blood cells, and that under the right conditions, homeopathic sodium chloride can be made to release light in the same way as normal sodium chloride. The idea that such highly-diluted preparations are not only still active, but retain characteristics of the original substances, may seem impossible, but these kinds of results show it’s a demonstrable fact.

Surely science should come into its own here – solving the riddles of the world around us, pushing the frontiers of knowledge. At least, that is the science I fell in love with. More of a puzzle to me now is the blinkered approach of those who continue, despite increasing evidence, to deny what is in front of them.

In the last few years, there has been much propaganda and misinformation circulated, much of it heralding the death of homeopathy, yet the evidence shows that interest in complementary and alternative medicine is growing.

In February, the “sceptics” campaign had a breakthrough – a report from the House of Commons Science and Technology Committee recommended no further NHS funding for homeopathy, despite a deeply flawed hearing.

The Society of Homeopaths – the largest body representing professional homeopaths – was refused permission to give oral evidence. Also notable by their absence from the panel were primary care trusts who currently commission homeopathy and representatives of patients who use homeopathy. Yet oral evidence was heard from a journalist previously investigated by the Press Complaints Commission for unsubstantiated criticism of homeopaths, and a spokesperson for a charity that has long publicly opposed homeopathy. It is significant that one of the four MPs asked to vote on the report abstained due to concerns about the lack of balance in the evidence heard.

Homeopathy is well-established in the UK, having been available through the NHS since its inception in 1948. More than 400 GPs use homeopathy in their everyday practice and the Society of Homeopaths has 1,500 registered members, from a variety of previous professions including pharmacists, journalists, solicitors and nurses.

And yet the portrayal of homeopathy as charlatanism and witchcraft continues. There is growing evidence that homeopathy works, that it is cost-effective and that patients want it. As drugs bills spiral, and evidence emerges that certain drugs routinely prescribed on the NHS are no better than placebos, maybe it’s time for “sceptics” to stop the witch hunt and look at putting their own house in order.

It’s all a far cry from the schoolgirl biologist who envisioned spending her life in a laboratory playing with bacteria.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2010/jul/15/homeopathy-works-scientific-evidence

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